Move The Date

Move the date

This year Earth Overshoot Day lands on 29 July – the day when humanity’s demand for ecological resources and services in 2021 exceeds what Earth can regenerate during the whole year.

When the world’s leaders arrive in Glasgow for the United Nations Climate Change Conference: COP26 in November, humanity will already be operating in ecological deficit for this year and growing the ecological debt which first occurred in the early 1970s.

Although the date of Earth Overshoot Day was pushed back last year as COVID-induced lockdowns and economic slowdown led to lower carbon emissions it has returned to what it was in 2019 as restrictions are being lifted in more and more countries.

The scale of environmental challenge facing humanity is enormous with a real urgency to act. We need swift action from businesses, governments, academia, and our communities at a local and global level.

Scotland has a vision for global environmental leadership and a great story to tell. We are taking strides to tackle climate change. In the last 30 years, we’ve halved Scotland’s greenhouse gas emissions. This is incredible progress. But we must do more. Some green actions (recycling, reducing food waste and energy use) have become mainstream. Now we must take on the tougher challenges – transport, heating systems, waste reduction, land use and innovating carbon capture technology. Scotland was at the forefront of the industrial revolution. We’ve invented solutions to global problems before and can do the same again.

Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) and Global Footprint Network (GFN) are growing their powerful partnership to inspire action on climate and resource security.

Let’s #MoveTheDate.

Get involved

Everyone can get involved and help.

Join the conversation online and let us know what you're doing to #MoveTheDate.

Take a step or explore solutions by finding out more from Global Footprint Network.

Watch The Mindset for a New Prosperity, TEDTalk from SEPA's CEO Terry A'Hearn.

Partners

Global Footprint Network

Earth Overshoot Day is an initiative of Global Footprint Network, an international research organization that is changing the way the world measures and manages its natural resources.

The date of Earth Overshoot Day is calculated with data from the National Footprint and Biocapacity Accounts, searchable and downloadable on the interactive open data platform data.footprintnetwork.org.

Scottish Environment Protection Agency

Everyday SEPA works to protect and enhance Scotland's environment, helping communities, and businesses thrive within the resources of one planet.

We call this One Planet Prosperity.

SEPA is Scotland’s principal environmental regulator.

Latest news

Earth Overshoot Day marks the launch of 100 Days of Possibility leading to COP26

Launched by Global Footprint Network, the Scottish EPA, and Schneider Electric, 100 Days of Possibility highlights actionable ways for each country, city, or business to ready themselves for the consequences of overshoot. These responses also #MoveTheDate of Earth Overshoot Day.

The initiative features proven and scalable solutions that contribute to bringing humanity’s Ecological Footprint in balance with the biological resources that the planet’s natural ecosystems can sustainably regenerate.

Read more

Earth Overshoot Day creeps back to July 29

The modest gains from the pandemic-induced resource-use reductions were short-lived, highlighting the urgency of driving an economic recovery where all can thrive within the means of the Earth.

Earth Overshoot Day 2021 lands on July 29, Susan Aitken, the Leader of Glasgow City Council, announced today on behalf of Global Footprint Network and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency.

The date is as early as 2019, after being momentarily pushed back in 2020 by the COVID 19-induced lockdowns. Notable drivers are the 6.6% carbon Footprint increase over last year, as well as the 0.5% decrease in global forest biocapacity due to the spike in Amazon deforestation—an estimated 43% increase over the 1.1 million hectares that were lost in 2020.

Read more